Tag Archives: Frangipani Tree

Setback for the Frangipani

10 Dec

The frangipani tree has sprouted new leaves. Initially the new leaves looked fine but it was too early to tell. But now that the leaves are more and bigger, the situation has not improved even with treatment some time back.

In fact, the rust fungus seems to be even more! Yikes. It’s a setback for the tree. So this time, hubby trimmed off all the leaves by himself without waiting for the gardener and his team to come and do it.

And it’s a good thing the netting that he placed over and on the branches was not removed. So it’s still functional to shade all his collection of air plants and bromeliads from the sun now that the tree is bald again.

The tree itself is fine, standing tall and sturdy; it’s only the leaves that are problematic. I guess this problem will not go away nor be cured. Sigh.

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Thriving Garden

29 Oct

Although I am not a garden person, I am happy to say that our garden and plants are thriving despite the wonky weather that we are experiencing. Wonky in the sense that it’s either super hot or super wet.

The frangipani tree is all good, so are hubby’s collection of air plants and bromeliads. Even the staghorn ferns that he acquired are healthy.

The smaller ones, remounted on wood planks, are doing really well and now hangs in one corner of the garden. They were purchased from our trip back to his hometown for Chinese New Year early this year.

As for the two big ones, they are mounted on the trees in front of the house and are also thriving beautifully despite their exposed fern leaves or fronds looking brown. These fronds are known as the shield frond because they protect the roots from damage and store water and nutrients. And the brown look is due to humidity issues and not because the fern is dying, so they should never be removed.

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The three amigos

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Giant staghorn #1

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Giant staghorn #2

Our Frangipani Tree, Part 3

25 Oct

It is slightly more than a month since its pruning and our frangipani tree has stabilised. New leaves are growing and so far they look healthy. No rust fungus splotches in other words.

I hope the netting covering the top, which has been providing an excellent shade for all the plants hanging on the branches beneath, won’t hinder the sprouting leaves. Maybe in time, the netting has to be removed; we will monitor the situation.

Thank goodness we didn’t have the tree chopped down as it’s been given a new lease in life.

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Pretty Colors

11 Oct

Hubby’s air plants have bloomed and the colors are so so pretty. I guess staying under the shaded Frangipani tree has really done wonders for them, protected from the onslaught of direct sunlight and rain.

I should go out to the garden more often to admire and appreciate all the greens and colors, weather permitting of course as rainy season has started.

 

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Our Frangipani Tree, Part 2

13 Sep

The last few days the garden was looking a bit messy with potted plants everywhere and air plants hanging at wherever possible. They had to be relocated when the gardener came to treat the Frangipani tree; we kept the branches intact but the poor tree’s looking pretty bald without any leaves.

During those few days out in the open, the poor plants were burnt by direct sunlight because no other parts of the garden have shades to protect them like the Frangipani tree.

So after the anti-fungal medication settled on the tree, it’s time to move the plants back to their original location and hubby had to improvise to create a temporary shade for the delicate air plants and bromeliads.

This is the end result. I think it works.

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Our Frangipani Tree

7 Sep

We have a lovely garden at the back of the house. And in the corner, facing the garden patio is our lovely Frangipani tree. Over the years, the tree blossomed and is perfect for hubby to hang all his air plants on its branches.

Years passed and the corner thrived. But recently, our tree fell sick, noticeable with most of the leaves having orange splotches – rust fungus. Yikes.

Now all this while, the tree has been treated with organic anti-fungal spray but perhaps it’s not effective enough resulting in its state today. So it was either we chop down the tree as an easy solution to get rid of the fungus or trim it and treat with a super strong poisonous anti-fungal spray to contain the situation.

We opted for the latter because we can’t bear to lose the tree and now it is looking rather bald. Poor tree! But we hope the treatment will do wonders and the tree will regain its full beauty. Only time can tell.

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Looking lush and looking bald

Frangipani leaves

Orange culprit be gone!

Let’s Climb a Tree

19 Jul

We have a lovely but skinny Frangipani tree at our back garden. One day the girls declared, “We wanna climb a tree!” And so the hubby indulged them as I watch their monkey acts from inside the living room.

Climb a tree? Hah! How sad my girls don’t know what climbing a real tree is all about as their antics brought back memories of me and my tree.

I grew up in a big house with an equally big garden. And there were trees, lots of trees. Thirty six of them. Sometimes, somethings in life you remember forever and this is one of them.

I remember going through a phase and would be counting every single tree in the compound, playing authority with a clipboard and going around the compound doing a census on trees. I don’t know why I did that but I was obsessed with it, doing it every evening. And of course, the result showed 36 matured trees. My mother loved her garden, full of flowers, plants and trees.

And I loved my tree. My tree was special; it was a matured mango tree and had sturdy branches snaking out as if it was creating a nest with spread out fingers. I would climb my tree every afternoon and sit there to daydream. The branches were so thick that I could lie down anywhere I fancy and stare at the leaves or beyond. One day while staring, I discovered caterpillars! Here, there, everywhere. Eeuuww. I stopped hanging out on my tree after that.

But the fact remains, today’s children hardly has the opportunity to experience what we experienced. Climbing trees and catching little fishes from the drain (as what the hubbby used to do) are deemed activities of the dinosaur era, for people like myself and the hubby. We may have one tree for the girls to attempt now but sadly our drains are all covered up. Development and time plus technology has rendered many classics to be obsolete today.

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